About L. Costantino

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far L. Costantino has created 20 blog entries.

An Editorial Review of “The Immortal Game” by Joannah Miley

2016-12-17T12:15:44-07:00By |

Adults, new and otherwise, will be entertained with Ruby’s experiences as she negotiates the intertwined worlds of mortals and immortals. Miley takes you from Portland, Oregon in a war-torn future to opulent Mount Olympus to the darkest halls of Hades as she keeps you turning the pages in this entertaining novel that successfully intertwines ancient Greek mythology with a contemporary story line that has just the right amount of romance, action, and adventure.

An Editorial Review of “A Simple Soul” by Vadim Babenko

2016-12-17T12:15:47-07:00By |

In this character-driven novel that delves deeply into the psyches of six flawed individuals seeking life’s meaning in post-Soviet Moscow, the most enigmatic character is Russia itself. "A Simple Soul" transcends genres and time as its characters move across the vast lands of Russia and its ever-changing socio-economic landscape. Prepare to be transported.

An Editorial Review of “Darklight II: Conflagration” by John Wells

2019-03-22T11:30:43-07:00By |

The Darklight series take readers beyond the confines of the known universe and into mind-boggling technologies that venture into multi-dimensional applications of universal cataclysmic potential .If you enjoy E.E. Smith’s space operas that influenced the first generation of computer war games, and (some say) the authors of Earthlight, Star Wars, Babylon 5, and Superman, then venture forth into the Darklight series to expand your universe.

An Editorial Review of “Artemis Rising” by Cheri Lasota

2016-12-17T12:15:47-07:00By |

Rendered with a lush and lyrical touch, this Y/A historical fantasy depicts the romantic yearnings of two innocent lovers, both dedicated to and trapped by the belief that they embody tragic figures from myth and legend.This well-written and crisply paced novel mixes the two myths: one Greek, the other of the canon of Arthurian literature.

An Editorial Review of “Deadly Addiction” by Kristine Cayne

2016-12-17T12:15:48-07:00By |

Deadly Addiction captures the devastating effects of poverty and substance abuse on a First Nations community while portraying the love affair of one tribal member determined to help his people. As brutally violent as it is flirtatious, this novel offers readers a realistic glimpse of contemporary life on a First Nations reserve. The story is populated by wonderfully realized characters.

“Family Bonds” by Kate Vale

2016-12-17T12:15:48-07:00By |

Family Bonds is a bighearted tale with an old-school, if at times, ingenuous sensibility. This is your mother’s romance novel, and aficionados of traditional love stories will find that refreshing.

Virtues of War by Bennett R. Coles

2018-12-29T14:16:05-07:00By |

The author, Bennett R. Coles, an officer with plus 15-years experience in the Canadian Navy, demonstrates a crisp writing style, an impressive knowledge of military tactics and techno jargon, and an imagination crossed with a study of physics that has produced believable weaponry and space travel of the future.

Nardi Point by Nancy LaPonzina

2016-12-17T12:15:51-07:00By |

Love among the ruins: in this case, an archaeological dig at a new subdivision in North Raleigh, where rolling pastures and woodsy farms are giving way to housing developments such as Nardi Point. Nardi Point develops into a lovely, nuanced tale with the layers of relationships uncovered like strata of earth, revealing harsh truths and personal epiphanies.

Look For Me by Janet Shawgo

2015-01-17T14:23:44-07:00By |

A lantern, a medicine pouch, and a bell to stop the gunfire: That was all nurses took into the Civil War battlefields as they sought out injured men, boys, and women disguised as men. Among them is Sarah Bowen, a young healer from Georgia, whose use of herbal medicine brings her scorn from most field doctors even as it saves countless lives...What the reader gains is an understanding not only of the medicinal uses of native plants, but of the women’s incredible resourcefulness.