About L Wilson Hunt

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So far L Wilson Hunt has created 13 blog entries.

An Editorial Review of “Rhythm for Sale” by Grant Harper Reid, Ph.D.

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Reid shares his grandfather’s journey from dancing in broken hob-nailed “tap” shoes to making the Southern Circuit via “country road walking,” to working in Vaudeville, to basement gin-joints, and on to legendary venues such as The Cotton Club and the Apollo Theater. Reid also lets his readers in on the darker side of the Harlem Renaissance, a time of racial segregation, political corruption, and cultural clash that was prevalent during this time period of American history.The book's tempo is fast-paced as the author condenses an encyclopedic amount of events, entertainers, prohibition gangsters, and the birth of a new genre of show business.

“Unforgiving, The Memoir of an Asperger Teen” by Margaret Jean Adam

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The memoir’s brave narrative, an inviting of mix diary excerpts and personal reflection along with some of her own very moving poetry, offers a clear view into the workings of the Asperger mind. One of the syndrome's hallmark symptoms is a lack of the ability to understand the subtleties of non-verbal communication. Social cues such as body language and facial expressions are opaque to its victims, whose resultant awkward and seemingly inappropriate behavior can leave them feeling isolated and misunderstood.

The Only Witness by Pamela Beason

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"The Only Witness" is a hip and socially relevant "who-done-it." Beason employs knowing doses of drama, humor, adventure and romance to polish her clever premise into a sparkling jewel; a friendly persuasion of plot and character development that maintains a high level of reader interest and fascination.

Murder One by Robert Dugoni

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In Murder One, lawyer turned novelist, Robert Dugoni has conjured up an intense page-turner that deftly mixes drama, mystery and suspense that will keep you guessing until its final pages.  Dugoni’s vivid characters in his novel are marvelously believable, as are the Seattle locales that are described. […]